Installation view, Vittorio Brodmann, Vehicles, PAGE (NYC), 2023

Installation view, Vittorio Brodmann, Vehicles, PAGE (NYC), 2023

Installation view, Vittorio Brodmann, Vehicles, PAGE (NYC), 2023

Installation view, Vittorio Brodmann, Vehicles, PAGE (NYC), 2023

Installation view, Vittorio Brodmann, Vehicles, PAGE (NYC), 2023

Installation view, Vittorio Brodmann, Vehicles, PAGE (NYC), 2023

Vittorio Brodmann, Slippage, 2023, Oil on canvas, 15.75 x 19.75 inches

Vittorio Brodmann, Losing the Plot, 2023, Oil and pencil on canvas, 35.5 x 23.5 inches

Vittorio Brodmann, Empty Promise, 2023, Oil on canvas, 13.75 x 17.75 inches

Vittorio Brodmann, Passage, 2023, Oil, pencil, and charcoal on canvas, Diptych: 15.75 x 37.5 inches

Vittorio Brodmann, Based on True Events, 2023, Oil on canvas, 13.75 x 17.75 inches

VITTORIO BRODMANN

Vehicles

May 6 – June 18, 2023

Page is pleased to present new paintings by Vittorio Brodmann. The latest works situate elastic forms in open ended scenarios, reaching for connections between subject matter as it clings, floats, and drifts around the canvas. Redacted and mixed up, images are displaced in and out of frames, while characters come and go behind windows at a leisurely pace. Each picture is populated by a wily range of symbols and figures, trying to claim some existence or just falling apart.

Cloudy schematics of cartoon sketches and floral doodles hover like fog. Even though the haze never quite settles, a refined balance of color gives the chaotic marks order. Such imagery is less directly representational, but rather a familiar creature in the crash test seat bearing the consequences of the painting's structural experimentation. A laptop-hogging donkey, a walk in the rain to be interrupted by a festive genie spirit. All in a day's routine—nothing strange going on here!

Compositions are fragmented and reorganized, pushing its contents out of the canvas. The paintings slide around like a cheese pizza on a bumpy ride, causing a dog’s face to melt and fan out. The pigment has settled, but the narratives are not yet completely set. Always in the process of becoming, even sometimes sticking together and growing into something new. The places have faces and the animals are allowed inside, often just sitting around waiting for some action.

—Lucas Page and Patrick Keville